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Welcome!

Are you concerned about mobile and smartphone security? If not, you should be! To help you understand the threats, a friend of mine -- Rik Ferguson -- put together the video you see below. Rik is Director of Security Research and Communication at Trend Micro. For more informative security/privacy analysis and comment, have a look at Rik's CounterMeasures security blog.

After watching the video, check out my book: How NOT To Use Your Smartphone.

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Smartphone security

Smartphone security: What you need to know

The benefits that come with advanced technology bring with them potential risks -- even in devices small enough to fit in the palm of your hand.

As the primary use of technology continues to make the transition from desktop to pocket, some say it's getting increasingly easier for your personal information to be compromised -- or more specifically, accessed by those with bad intentions.

The next few months could prove to be a critical period for smartphone users and their security issues, experts say. But until consumers actually begin utilizing the security tools already at their disposal, many believe hackers will continue to develop increasingly clever methods to obtain your information, including contacts lists, usernames, passwords and even your banking and credit card info.

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iPhone vs. Android

iPhone vs. Android - Overconfidence vs. 'the Wild West'

Think you're necessarily free from being hacked because you use an Apple iPhone?

Think again.

Experts warn that overconfidence among iPhone users could be the very reason they become hacked in the not-so-distant future.

Though the technology giant is usually known for providing a more hacker- resistent environment than mobile phone rivals Android and Microsoft, that doesn't mean slip-ups aren't possible on the iPhone.

Rod Cambridge, a United Kingdom-based computer security expert and author of the book How NOT to Use Your Smartphone, recalled in November 2011, when security expert Charlie Miller created a stock- tracking app for Apple that was eventually approved and distributed for use on the App Store.